Systems Engineering

Engineering Insight

ERC delivers systems engineering and integration solutions that support high-consequence work for the Army, Air Force, Missile Defense Agency, and NASA. Our systems engineers support the design, management, and operation of developmental weapon systems, next-generation space vehicles, and cutting-edge test equipment. By combining extensive domain knowledge with advanced engineering expertise, we help our customers build complex systems that mitigate risk, decrease costs, and optimize mission capabilities.

Our work spans the entire design and development life cycle. We provide the insight and expertise needed for mission success by developing and managing requirements, delivering acquisition support, performing risk analysis and assessment, modeling systems and subsystems, and verifying and validating fully integrated solutions.

How We Do It

New Dimensions in Productivity

How do you cut the time for producing prototypes from months to weeks? Using 3D additive manufacturing and rapid prototyping techniques, NASA reduces the time and cost of manufacturing complex geometric parts anywhere from 40 percent to 80 percent. ERC provides the specialized engineering needed to help make this world-class manufacturing program a reality at Marshall Space Center. In addition to time and money, 3D printing has also removes many traditional manufacturing limitations, allowing engineers to design complex parts better suited to the mission.

To the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

When NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) takes off on its first flight, the most powerful rocket ever built will produce 8.8 million pounds of thrust. The unprecedented power means that the SLS can carry explorers, equipment, and science payloads on missions to the moon, Mars, and deep into space. The SLS will enable astronauts to explore destinations far out in the solar system and to bring back new knowledge and opportunities.

ERC provides systems engineering and technical support throughout the development and production of the SLS. At the Marshall Space Center, we have supported the component design, development, and qualification testing of all major elements of the SLS vehicle, including the engine section, liquid oxygen tank, core stage intertank, launch vehicle stage adapter, and the multistage adapter. We have also tested the SLS thrusters and hypergolic propellants at the White Sands Test Facilities. Finally, our work at the Kennedy Space Center includes testing, integration, and stacking of the SLS rocket components. Ultimately, we will be part of the launch control and recovery team when the SLS makes its historic first flight.